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Church Of Jesus Christ Latter Day Saints Beliefs

The Church Of Jesus Christ Of Latter

13 Mormon Beliefs | Now You Know

MormonismChurch of Christ Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
Official logo since 2020 featuring the Christus statue
Classification
  • Restored Church of Jesus Christ
Official website .org

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, often informally known as the LDS Church or Mormon Church, is a nontrinitarian, Christian church that considers itself to be the restoration of the original church founded by Jesus Christ. The church is headquartered in the United States in Salt Lake City, Utah, and has established congregations and built temples worldwide. According to the church, it has over 16.8 million members and 54,539 full-time volunteer missionaries. The church is the fourth-largest Christian denomination in the United States, with over 6.7 million US members as of 2021. It is the largest denomination in the Latter Day Saint movement founded by Joseph Smith during the early 19th-century period of religious revival known as the Second Great Awakening.

The church has been criticized throughout its history. Modern criticisms include disputed claims, treatment of minorities, and financial controversies. The churchs practice of polygamy was also controversial until officially rescinded in 1890.

Beliefs About Gods Plan For Us

  • To us, the plan of salvation is Gods plan for our development. Our creation as spirits, our life on earth, death, and life in heaven.
  • God put us here on earth as part of His plan. Because we are to learn to walk by faith and not by sight he placed a veil over our memory of life before birth. This makes us not remember our eternal life before this mortal journey, so that we may act completely for ourselves without external influences.
  • The purpose of life is to learn to follow Gods ways even with the mortal temptations of the body, the distractions of mortal life, and in a place where God is not physically present. We are to improve ourselves no matter the conditions of our birth, and to become gentle, kind, generous, and charitable to others. In short, to try and develop Christs characteristics.
  • Another purpose of life on earth is to have families with our physical bodies, and to raise our children to be good people and to follow God.
  • Our mortal bodies will die, but after death, our spirits will live on. Because Jesus Christ overcame death, he will resurrect all people. All people will be raised from the dead.
  • We believe Christs repeated teachings in the Bible that we will be judged by our works here on earth. We all must be accountable before God for our righteous and evil acts. Jesus Christ has paid the price for our sins, and we can be made clean through his grace.

The Founder Joseph Smith Jr

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints was officially founded by Joseph Smith, Jr. and five associates on April 6, 1830, in Fayette, New York.

When Smith was fourteen years old, he claimed to have had a religious experience, in which both God the Father and Jesus Christ spoke to him and instructed him not to affiliate himself with any denomination. Three years later, he reported being visited again by a heavenly angel named Moroni who told him that a book written on gold plates had been buried and Smith had been charged with its protection.

Smith allegedly retrieved the gold plates in 1827 and began the process of translating their engravings. On March 26, 1830, when his dictation was complete, Smith published the work as the Book of Mormon. Shortly thereafter, on April 6, 1830, Smith also founded the first Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints church.

To avoid conflict and persecution encountered for his claims, Smith and his followers moved to Kirtland, Ohio early in 1831. Here the church’s first temple was built and some Mormons believed erroneously that Jesus’ Millennial reign had begun. However, the controversy and mob violence that had plagued Smith followed him to Kirtland and in early 1832, Joseph was dragged from his bedroom in the dead of night, tarred and feathered, and left for dead.

In February, 1844, Smith announced his candidacy for President of the United States, with Sidney Rigdon as his vice-presidential running mate.

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The Book Of Mormon Is Another Testament Of Jesus Christ

As further confirmation of the divinity of the work Joseph Smith was called to do, the Lord revealed a volume of ancient scripture which had been recorded on the American Continent. Joseph Smith was given power to translate this record, which came to be known as the Book of Mormon. It contains the writings of prophets who lived and taught in the Americas at the time the Bible was being written in Jerusalem. The Book of Mormon contains many beautiful truths about the Savior Jesus Christ, and stands with the Bible as a second witness that Jesus was more than just a man: He was the very Messiah prophesied of in times of old, the Savior and the Redeemer of Mankind.

Because it was translated by the power of God, the Book of Mormon also serves as a witness that Joseph Smith was called by God, for if the Book of Mormon is a true record inspired by God, then Joseph Smith must also be a prophet. By knowing that Joseph Smith was a prophet, men and women can also know that the church he was led to organize is Christ’s church today.

What Is The Difference Between Mormon And Latter

The Mormon Church Also Called the Church of Jesus Christ of the Latter ...

People who follow the teachings of Jesus Christ and are members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints are referred to as Latter-day Saints or members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in more proper contexts. However, the majority of members of the Church do not mind being referred to as Mormons.

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Why Is Family Life So Central To Latter

  • about genealogy and the Mormon archives.

Mormons believe that the family is an eternal unit and central to God’s plan. In fact, eternal progression toward Godhood is limited to those who marry for time and eternity in a ceremony conducted by a properly ordained member of the LDS priesthood in a Mormon temple. Church President Hinckley has also stressed the importance of the family during mortal life, saying, “If you want to reform a nation, you begin with families, with parents who teach their children principles and values that are positive and affirmative and will lead them to worthwhile endeavors. That is the basic failure that has taken place in America. And we are making a tremendous effort to bring about greater solidarity in families. Parents have no greater responsibility in this world than the bringing up of their children in the right way, and they will have no greater satisfaction as the years pass than to see those children grow in integrity and honesty and make something of their lives, adding to society because they are a part of it.” To strengthen families, many Mormons observe “family home evening.” This is one night a week — generally Monday — that a family spends together praying, learning about scripture, sharing things from their lives, and playing games or engaging in other fun at-home activities.

The Thirteen Articles Of Faith

  • We believe in God, the Eternal Father, and in His Son, Jesus Christ, and in the Holy Ghost.
  • We believe that men will be punished for their own sins, and not for Adam’s transgression.
  • We believe that through the Atonement of Christ, all mankind may be saved, by obedience to the laws and ordinances of the gospel.
  • We believe that the first principles and ordinances of the Gospel are: first, Faith in the Lord Jesus Christ second, Repentance third, Baptism by immersion for the remission of sins fourth, Laying on of hands for the gift of the Holy Ghost.
  • We believe that a man must be , by prophecy, and by the laying on of hands by those who are in authority, to preach the Gospel and administer in the ordinances thereof.
  • We believe in the same organization that existed in the Primitive Church, namely, apostles, prophets, pastors, teachers, evangelists, and so forth.
  • We believe in the gift of tongues, prophecy, revelation, visions, healing, interpretation of tongues, and so forth.
  • We believe the Bible to be the word of God as far as it is translated correctly we also believe the Book of Mormon to be the word of God.
  • We believe all that God has revealed, all that He does now reveal, and we believe that He will yet reveal many great and important things pertaining to the Kingdom of God.
  • We claim the privilege of worshiping Almighty God according to the dictates of our own conscience, and allow all men the same privilege, let them worship how, where, or what they may.
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    Why Do You Baptize For The Dead

    Jesus Christ taught that except a man be born of water and of the Spirit, he cannot enter into the kingdom of God . For those who have passed on without the ordinance of baptism, proxy baptism for the deceased is a free-will offering. According to Church doctrine, a departed soul in the afterlife is completely free to accept or reject such a baptismthe offering is freely given and must be freely received. The ordinance does not force deceased persons to become members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, nor does the Church list deceased persons as members of the Church. In short, there is no change in the religion or heritage of the recipient or of the recipients descendantsthe notion of coerced conversion is utterly contrary to Church doctrine.

    Proxy baptism for the deceased is nothing new. It was mentioned by Paul in the New Testament and was practiced by groups of early Christians. As part of a restoration of New Testament Christianity, Latter-day Saints continue this practice. All Church members are instructed to submit names for proxy baptism only for their own deceased relatives as an offering of familial love.

    Read more on this subject here

    What Is Forbidden In Mormonism

    What do Mormons Believe About God? | Now You Know

    Tobacco, alcoholic beverages, tea and coffee, as well as illegal narcotics Everything on this list, with the exception of illegal substances, is expressly forbidden by the Word of Wisdom.The prophets have made it quite plain that narcotics, with the exception of those used for medicinal purposes, are forbidden.Caffeine-containing soft drinks are another beverage that Mormons are severely forbidden from consuming.

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    Mormons And Family Life

    The survey confirms that family life is very important to most Mormons. Four out of five Mormons believe that being a good parent is one of the most important goals in life, and roughly three out of four Mormons put having a successful marriage in this category. This puts family concerns significantly above career concerns, having free time and even living a very religious life as priorities for Mormons.

    Two-thirds of Mormon adults are married, compared with 52% of the general public.3 More than four out of five married Mormons are married to another Mormon. By comparison, 81% of married Protestants are married to another Protestant, and 78% of married Catholics are married to another Catholic, according to the Pew Forums 2007 U.S. Religious Landscape Survey.

    Nearly six-in-ten Mormons say that the more satisfying kind of marriage is one where the husband provides for the family and the wife takes care of the house and children, while 38% say that a marriage where the husband and wife both have jobs and both take care of the house and children is preferable. Among the general public, the balance of opinion on this question is reversed 30% prefer a marriage where the husband is the sole breadwinner, while 62% prefer a marriage in which both husband and wife work.

    Church Of Jesus Christ Of Latter

    The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, widely known as the “LDS Church” or the “Mormon Church,” is the largest and most well-known denomination within the Latter Day Saint’s movement. Founded in the United States by Joseph Smith, Jr. in 1830, the Latter-day Saints regard Christ as the head of their church and count themselves as Christians, but do not consider themselves part of the Catholic, Orthodox, or Protestant traditions.

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    Mormons In America Certain In Their Beliefs Uncertain Of Their Place In Society

    With a Mormon candidate among the front-runners for the 2012 GOP presidential nomination, a musical about Mormons playing on Broadway and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints running television ads about ordinary Mormons, America is in the midst of what some media accounts have dubbed a Mormon moment. But how do Mormons themselves feel about the media spotlight, the election campaign and their place in America? A major new survey finds a mixed picture: Many Mormons feel they are misunderstood, discriminated against and not accepted by other Americans as part of mainstream society. Yet, at the same time, a majority of Mormons think that acceptance of Mormonism is rising. Overwhelmingly, they are satisfied with their lives and content with their communities. And most say they think the country is ready to elect a Mormon president.

    These are among the findings of a comprehensive survey by the Pew Research Centers Forum on Religion & Public Life of more than 1,000 Mormons across the country the first of its kind ever published by a non-LDS research organization. Previous studies, including the Pew Forums 2007 U.S. Religious Landscape Survey, have found that Mormons make up slightly less than 2% of the U.S. public.

    How Did The Church Begin

    Church of Jesus Christ of Latter

    The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints was founded by Joseph Smith in New York State in 1830. This era is often referred to as the Second Great Awakening, a Protestant religious revival, in which preachers including Smith called for the restoration of Christianity, which they saw as corrupt.

    According to Smiths account, he was visited in the 1820s by an angel called Moroni, who revealed to him the location of a new revelation from God, called the Book of Mormon. It was discovered by Smith in the form of gold plates or tablets, buried near his family farm in New York State.

    The Book of Mormon includes stories about the ancient peoples of the North American continent, who had travelled there from Israel, as recorded by the prophet Mormon and his son, the angel Moroni. It claims that Jesus visited the Americas after his resurrection. Smith said it was written in a new language which he alone could translate, and as he gradually converted the texts into English they revealed the structure of a new religious movement which he then established.

    Gradually Smith gathered a group of followers, often by converting people who were already interested in restorationist versions of Christianity, and tried to settle the nascent church in several towns.

    In 1844 Smith and his brother Hyrum were charged with riot and treason and were shot dead by a mob while being held in an Illinois jail awaiting trial.

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    What Is The Position Of The Church Regarding Race Relations

    The gospel of Jesus Christ is for everyone. The Book of Mormon states, Black and white, bond and free, male and female all are alike unto God . This is the Churchs official teaching.

    People of all races have always been welcomed and baptized into the Church since its beginning. In fact, at the end of his life in 1844, Joseph Smith, the founding prophet of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, opposed slavery. During this time some black males were ordained to the priesthood. At some point the Church stopped ordaining male members of African descent, although there were a few exceptions. It is not known precisely why, how or when this restriction began in the Church, but it has ended. Church leaders sought divine guidance regarding the issue and in 1978 extended the priesthood to all worthy male members. The Church immediately began ordaining members to priesthood offices wherever they attended throughout the world.

    The Church unequivocally condemns racism, including any and all past racism by individuals both inside and outside the Church. In 2006, then Church president Gordon B. Hinckley declared that no man who makes disparaging remarks concerning those of another race can consider himself a true disciple of Christ. Nor can he consider himself to be in harmony with the teachings of the Church of Christ. Let us all recognize that each of us is a son or daughter of our Father in Heaven, who loves all of His children .

    Other Lds Beliefs Not Contained In The 13 Articles Of Faith

    The 13 Articles of Faith were never intended to be comprehensive. They are simply useful in understanding some basic Mormons beliefs.

    Through the blessing of modern revelation, Mormons believe that the full gospel of Jesus Christ is on the earth. These include all the ordinances necessary for the salvation of all people.

    These ordinances are exclusively available in our temples. These ordinances allow us to seal families, not just for time, but for eternity as well.

    Additional scripture has also been revealed. This scripture composes what Mormons refer to as the standard works. These are four different books.

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