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Church Of Latter Day Saints Washington Dc

Washington Dc Temple Rededication

Inside the Latter-day Saints’ Washington D.C. Temple

The renovated Washington D.C. Temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints will be rededicated on Sunday, August 14, 2022, in three sessions: at 10 a.m., 1:30 p.m., and 5 p.m. Based on current information, those who attend any of the three sessions of the rededication in the temple are required to wear a face mask.

President Russell M. Nelson will dedicate the temple. The following leaders will also participate in the dedication: President Dallin H. Oaks and President Henry B. Eyring of the First Presidency Elders Quentin L. Cook, D. Todd Christofferson and Gerrit W. Gong of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles Presiding Bishop Gérald Caussé Elder Paul V. Johnson of the Presidency of the Seventy Sister Amy A. Wright of the Primary General Presidency and Elders W. Mark Bassett, Kevin R. Duncan, Allen D. Haynie and Vai Sikahema of the Seventy.

A public open house was held earlier this year.

The temple was closed in 2018 to renovate mechanical and electrical systems and refresh finishes and furnishing.

The originally scheduled rededication date in December 2020 was postponed due to the COVID-19 pandemic. In January, the First Presidency extended the dates of the open house and rescheduled the rededication date from June to August, due to historic demand to participate in the open house.

The temple, the Churchs 16th in operation, was announced in 1968 and was dedicated six years later by President Spencer W. Kimball.

Washington Dc Temple Open House

The public open house for the renovated Washington D.C. Temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints begins April 28 and will be extended as needed. No tours are given on Sundays.

Open house ticket information is available at DCTemple.org.

The rededication events originally scheduled for September, October and December of 2021 were postponed due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

The open house will mark the first time the public will be able to tour the temple the first Latter-day Saint edifice built in the eastern United States since its 1974 dedication.

There will be no youth devotional on Saturday, August 13. The three sessions of the rededication on Sunday, August 14, will be broadcast to Latter-day Saint meetinghouses within the Washington D.C. Temple district.

The temple closed for renovations in 2018 to update mechanical and electrical systems, refresh finishes and furnishing and improve the grounds. The temple, the Churchs 16th in operation, was announced in 1968 and was dedicated six years later by President Spencer W. Kimball.

The original public open house of the Washington D.C. Temple was attended by 758,328 guests, including Betty Ford, wife of thenU.S. president Gerald Ford. These tours resulted in over 75,000 missionary referrals.

Washington Dc Temple Announcements

The First Presidency of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints has announced that the Washington D.C. Temple will close in March 2018 for extensive renovation. The temple is expected to be closed for a period of at least two years. Per Mormon Newsroom, as part of the renovation, the mechanical systems will be upgraded and the finish and furnishings will be refreshed.

Following the completion of the Washington D.C. Temple renovation in 2020, the temple will be rededicated. A public open house and rededication information will be provided as the renovations near completion. The visitors’ center will remain open throughout the renovation.

The open house and rededication of the Washington D.C. Temple were postponed because of the effects of COVID-19.

The public open house was held from April 28, 2022, through June 11, 2022. Visitors surpassed a quarter of a million. On May 24, the Church released a virtual tour of the Washington D.C. Temple, offering 360-degree views inside and outside of the sacred building. Posted on ChurchofJesusChrist.org, the YouTube video includes the welcome desk, walkway bridge, dressing rooms, baptistry, brideâs room, a sealing room, stair cases, initiatory area, an endowment room and the celestial room.

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Public Tours Of The Iconic Somewhat Mysterious Church Of Latter

Its hard to miss when cruising down the Capitol Beltway in Maryland. Its six golden spires rise from the horizon like the Emerald City in the Wizard of Oz, while its towering white marble is reminiscent of Disneyland. But its not an amusement park nor a storybook cityits the areas Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, although you most likely know it as the Mormon Temple .

Since 1974, this incredible temple, with its beautiful towering spires, has been an iconic landmark in the Maryland skyline, said Maryland Governor Larry Hogan during a press conference at the temples visitor center on Monday.

Yet its also a landmark thats been sealed off to the public for nearly 50 years. No one from outside the church has seen its interior since it first opened in 1974, when more than 750,000 people toured the 156,558-square-foot building.

But starting April 28, that stringent rule will be relaxed, if only temporarily. After closing for renovations in March 2018, the temple is, for the second time in its history, allowing the public to tour its halls for the next few months. Once rededicated as a holy site on August 14, it will become sealed off to the public once again.

Whether you see the temple as secret or sacred, now is likely your only chance to see its interiorsthat is, unless you convert .

Looking Back On The Influence Closure Renovation And Open House Of Washington Dc Temple As President Nelson Prepares To Rededicate The Iconic Edifice

Mormon temple, Church of jesus christ of latter day saints. La jolla ...

The Church News chronicles the historic events connected to the renovation and rededication of the Washington D.C. Temple

Colorful trees surround The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Washington D.C. Temple in Kensington, Maryland on Friday, April 22, 2022.

Jeffrey D. Allred, Deseret News

KENSINGTON, Maryland After a four-and-a-half-year renovation project including delays connected to the COVID-19 pandemic President Russell M. Nelson will rededicate the Washington D.C. Temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on Sunday, Aug. 14.

With its six golden spires reaching heavenward above the Capital Beltway, the Washington D.C. Temple has stood as an iconic landmark in this area for almost 50 years. Millions have seen the prominent and commanding edifice, located just 10 miles from the United States Capitol in the District of Columbia. The temple, the Churchs 16th in operation and the first built in the Eastern United States, closed in 2018 to update mechanical and electrical systems, refresh finishes and furnishings, and improve the grounds.

In honor of the rededication, the Church News looks back and chronicles the historic events connected to the renovation and rededication of the Washington D.C. Temple.

Church President Spencer W. Kimball shares scriptures and books with U.S. President Gerald and Betty Ford in Salt Lake City a few months after Betty Ford toured the Washington D.C. Temple with President Kimball.

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The Washington D C Temple Dedication

The Washington D.C. Temple was dedicated in 10 sessions held from 19-22 November 1974. Church President, Spencer W. Kimball offered the dedicatory prayer, in which he gave thanks for those who paved the way for the founding of the United States: âWe are grateful that thou didst cause this land to be rediscovered and settled by people who founded a great nation with an inspired constitution guaranteeing freedom in which there could come the glorious restoration of the gospel and the Church of thy Beloved Son.â More than 40,000 members were able to attend the dedicatory services.

New Renderings Of The Washington Dc Temple

The images for the following gallery of pictures were obtained from LDS Living.and are ©2020 by Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved.

  • Rendering of the celestial room in the Washington D.C. Temple.

  • Rendering of an instruction room in the Washington D.C. Temple.

  • Rendering of the baptistry in the Washington D.C. Temple.

  • Rendering of the bridge pathway in the Washington D.C. Temple.

  • Rendering of the entry into the Washington D.C. Temple.

  • Rendering of the rotunda in the Washington D.C. Temple.

  • Rendering of a sealing room in the Washington D.C. Temple.

  • Rendering of the priesthood room in the Washington D.C. Temple.

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Features Inside The Temple

The brides’ room in the newly renovated Washington D.C. Temple.

That meant ditching the blue shag carpet of the 1970s but keeping the clean, geometric aesthetic of midcentury modern design. Gothic arches are worked into marble altars, metal staircases and wood doors to carry the motif of looking heavenward.

A serene color scheme of beiges, pale yellows, grays, light greens, white marble and gold leaf are carried throughout the temple. Glittering Swarovski chandeliers got new crystals made in Austria and church volunteers worked together in groups to put them into the fixtures, said Emily Utt, historic sites curator for the church.

Sharon Eubank, first counselor in the general Relief Society presidency, said she loves the symbolism of 18,500 pieces of stained glass being removed from windows and restored individually.

Every one of us, she said, reflects light in a different way.

The seven stories are broken into intimate rooms to handle the temples main functions: baptizing by proxy for deceased ancestors, educating members and sealing families together for eternity. Bednar and other church officials said they were excited to show the public what they do inside to dispel rumors and untruths about their faith.

Theyve driven past for 40 to 50 years, Holt said, and when they come in, theyll be surprised to see its a more intimate space than what they anticipated.

The Celestial Room of the newly renovated Washington D.C. Temple.

The Church Of Jesus Christ Of Latter

A Sacred House of the Lord | Washington D.C. Temple
The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Washington
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The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Washington refers to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and its members in Washington. Washington has the 6th most members of the LDS Church in the United States. The LDS Church is the 2nd largest denomination in Washington, behind the Roman Catholic Church.

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Washington Dcs Mormon Temple Opens For The First Time In Nearly 50 Years

The interiors of the white marbled structure remained immune to the general public since the entry to the Church was sealed off nearly 50 years ago

Shutterstock

Situated along the Capital Beltway in Washington DC, the Mormon Temple or the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, in the last 50 years, has been frequented by only a select few members of the Church. Reason? Entry to the temple is prohibited unless youre member of the Church. However, that is going to change for the next few days.

The general public can now acquaint itself with the pristine hallways of the Church till June 11 this year, after which it will become sealed off for the public again. The Church has been closed since 2018 for renovations is considered one of the most sacred spaces. It was originally designed by Fred L. Markham, Harold K. Beecher, Henry P. Fetzer, and Keith Wilcox and its interiors as well as exteriors remain mostly the same, with subtle changes. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints has temples across with globe 173 to be precise since the 1830s. However, the one in Washington DC is the tallest amongst all.

Shutterstock

Families Can Be Forever

The Latter-day Saint teaching that family relationships on earth continue after death is distinctive among Christian faiths. To last beyond mortality, marriages must take place in a temple. Couples who join the Church after they are already married may also have their marriages sealed in identical ceremonies, and their children may be sealed to them. Thus, Latter-day Saint temples are not places of regular Sunday or congregational worship. They are built specifically for these eternal marriages and other individual and family-centered ceremonies. For the promises of the temple to remain in effect, a husband and wife must love and be faithful to each other throughout their marriage and continue to follow a course of Christian service and commitment throughout their lives.

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A Visit To The Latter

Jonathan Affeltranger helps Hamil R. Harris visit the Latter-day Saints temple in Washington, D.C.

KENSINGTON, Maryland The seven-story temple of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints looms high above the Interstate 495 Beltway in the Maryland suburbs of Washington, D.C. and someone spray-painted on an adjoining wall Free Dorothy, inspired by The Wizard of Oz.

The six gold-tipped spires of the temple, originally dedicated in 1974, stoke intrigue like Emerald City in the 1939 movie starring Judy Garland. Part of the attraction is that the Latter-day Saints temple is off-limits to the public except for an open house, which has not taken place in nearly 50 years, since 1974.

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints commonly known as the Mormon Church has about 215 temples across the country. Unlike a regular church or stake center, these facilities are dedicated to the House of the Lord. Church members use them for various ordinances that include marriages, baptisms and proxy baptisms for those who have died.

Some that roughly 13,000 Latter-day Saints live in the Washington D.C. area, while the D.C. temple also serves a larger group of 150,000 Latter-day Saints on the East Coast.

I wasn’t there as a journalist. I was just a hefty man in a wheelchair. I was just like others, from CNNs Wolf Blitzer to NAACP President Derrick Johnson, and from members of Congress to justices on the U.S. Supreme Court.

History Of The Dc Temple

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter

On a serene 57.4-acre hilltop in Kensington, Maryland, the Washington D.C. Temple creates an impressive sight for travelers along the Capital Beltway. The 16th operating temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints serves Church members in the District of Columbia, Virginia, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Delaware, West Virginia, and New Jersey.

The Washington D.C. Temple was the first Latter-day Saint temple to be built on the East Coast of the United States. When the temple was completed in 1974, it served all Latter-day Saints living east of the Mississippi and some Latter-day Saints in South America and Canada. At 160,000 square feet, it is the third-largest temple in the world. It contains instruction rooms and sealing rooms, where marriages are performed.

2

On March 3, 2018, the Washington D.C. Temple closed for an extensive renovation. The building received considerable upgrades to its mechanical system and the finishes and furnishings were refreshed. There were also changes made to the landscaping and a small addition to the exterior to enclose a new elevator system and stairs.

The project was completed in 2020, and because of COVID-19, the open house was delayed until 2022.

Adjacent to the temple, the Washington D.C. Temple Visitors Center provides the opportunity for visitors to learn more about temples and the Churchs teachings.

1 In To Build a Temple, Ensign, Aug. 1974, 16.

2 President Kimball Dedicates Temple, Ensign, Feb. 1975, 81.

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Temples Of The Church Of Jesus Christ Of Latter

São Paulo Brazil Temple
17th dedicated temple in operation

Address

Announcement:

Public Open House:

Rededication:

Exterior Finish:

Architectural Features:

Ordinance Rooms:

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Temple Locale

Standing in one of the largest cities in the world, the São Paulo Brazil Temple occupies a beautifully landscaped tract of land on the western side of the city near a major shopping mall and Metro station, providing patrons a public transportation option to the temple. Situated on the triangular lot next to the temple are a visitors’ center, accommodation center, stake center, and offices for the Brazil Area. The grounds feature a decorative water fountain and colorful flowerbeds.

Temple History

The São Paulo Brazil Temple was the first temple built in South America .

The São Paulo Brazil Temple was originally named the São Paulo Temple.

Latin American members made numerous sacrifices of time, money, and material treasures to raise money for the São Paulo Brazil Temple.

At the time the São Paulo Brazil Temple was completed, there were only 15 stakes and about 54,000 members in the entire country. Following the dedication, an incredible 41 additional stakes were organized over the next 12 years, putting national membership at more than 300,000.

Before the São Paulo Brazil Temple was constructed, the closest temple to the Brazilian Saints was the Washington D.C. Temple.

Temple Background

  • Richard O. Cowan, “The Pace Quickens,” Temples to Dot the Earth : 181.
  • Washington Dc Temple Opens Doors To General Public For First Time In 50 Years

    The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints has completed a two year renovation project of their Washington D.C. Temple. As with other LDS temples, this one has been open only to members since its dedication in 1974, but with renovations complete, the temple has opened its doors briefly to all who want to tour until .

    When the temple finished original construction between 1971 and 1974, the church allowed the general public to tour between September and October that year, resulting in some 750,000 visiting before its dedication by LDS Church President Spencer W. Kimball.

    According to LDS policy, When a temple is first built, it is briefly open for public tours. Once dedicated, attendance is reserved for faithful members of the Church who are ready to participate in additional gospel ordinances .

    The Washington D.C. Temple stands as a landmark which can be seen by drivers along the Capital Beltway. The temple itself is 160,000 square feet, has six spires echoing the design of the Salt Lake Temple, and a central tower reaching 288 feet high, built on 57 acres atop a hill in Kensington, Maryland. It was designed by Latter-day Saint architects Harold K. Beecher, Henry P. Fetzer, Fred L. Markham, and Keith W. Wilcox. In 2018 the temple closed for renovations, which were completed in 2020, but the open house and dedication was delayed until 2022 because of the pandemic.

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